• cone flower (c) Henry T. McLin on flikr

    Enemies to Bees: Pesticides and Hybridized Plants

    Honeybee gardens Honeybee gardens are an earth-friendly way to save on water usage, beautify your yard, and help honeybees. Who wouldn’t rather look at beautiful flowers in the spring, summer, and fall instead of a grass lawn that needs to be cut every week? There are many things to consider when planning your honeybee garden, […]

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  • Bee Garden Beginnings (c) OakleyOriginals on flikr

    Build a bee friendly garden to help the bees

    So you want to plant a bee garden of your own? Follow these guidelines for a project that can be great fun for kids and a sanctuary for bees. Location, location, location First, decide where in your yard is the best location for a bee friendly garden. Consider placing the bee garden in a part of your […]

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  • Time-Life-of-Bees-p63

    Why Bees are Disappearing: A TED talk by Marla Spivak

    The new TED Talk by Marla Spivak, professor of entomology, is about the decline in honey bee populations, monoculture, pesticides (including neonicotinoids) and how important it is to plant bee-friendly flowers.

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  • Blessing of the Bees at NYC's Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Photo © by Jan Mun

    Cathedral Of St. John The Divine Welcomes–and Blesses–New Honey Bee Hive

    NYC Beekeeping and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine team up for bees A new urban honey bee sanctuary has been installed in the gardens of The Cathedral of St. John the Divine. The Cathedral gardens, which are already home to three peacocks and a family of red-tailed hawks, is now also home to a […]

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  • Salix discolor, North American native pussy willow © Michaela at TGE

    Come to Me, My Sweet Pussy willow

    Pussy willow – a fantastic early spring pollen source Salix discolor (as our North American native pussy willow is formally called) is a North American native shrub or small, understory tree, (5-15′ tall and perhaps 8′ wide). Often found beside brooks and forest streams, or in low-lying thickets and swamps from Canada to Georgia, the pussy willow […]

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  • A Sunny Combination of Meadow Flowers for a Long-Blooming, Informal Summer Garden. Photo ⓒ Michaela at TGE

    Go a Little Less Green for the Environment

    Consider Replacing Part or All of Your Front Lawn with a Pollinator-Friendly Garden. You’ll create habitat for honey bees and other pollinators and add beauty to your yard.

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  • CC image courtesy of Jean Tosti on Flickr

    Trees, Bees and Global Warming

    Global forests are suffering from rising temperatures There are a number of important reasons why the Carmel Forest should mostly be allowed to rehabilitate itself. According to NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies the temperatures across the planet between December 1, 2009, and November 30, 2010, show that 2010 ranks as the hottest year on […]

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    I knew it … Neonicotinoids are Affecting our Bees

    The EPA’s own research indicates neonicotinoids toxicity to bees, yet the class of pesticide is used on the nation’s most widely planted crops. “Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.” Buddha […]

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  • Summersweet, (Clethra alnifolia 'Ruby Spice'), is a native shrub, providing easily accessed, late-season pollen for the honey bee

    On Winter and Your Garden

    Before we turn your focus on homey comforts, consider doing the honey bees a favor before the cold, tough winter. As the trees finally shed their leaves and our thoughts turn to wintery pleasures and indoor activities, it’s easy to forget about the honey bee. After all, our busy little friends are hibernating out of […]

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  • Lindera benzoin at Fercliff in late September (planted here with Juniperus chinensis ‘Sargentii’ and Ilex verticillata ‘Red Sprite’)

    Mellow Yellow: Lovely Lindera Benzoin

    North American Native Spicebush is important for bee colonies in the early spring The question comes up every September in my garden. The meter-reader, oil delivery driver and countless guests have asked: “What’s that bright yellow shrub over there by the wall… The one covered with birds and red berries?” When I ask, “Have you […]

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