Meet the bloggers

Guillermo

Guillermo Fernandez officially has “bee fever.”  The grandson of a beekeeper, he assists with some hives in NYC.  He has held key marketing roles at People, Vanity Fair and Vogue magazines.  His dream is to come face-to-face with Mayan stingless bee (Melipona beecheii).


Kellen

Kellen Henry is a beekeeper and digital journalist based in Brooklyn, NY. She currently has two hives with celebrity queens Beeyonce and Bee Arthur. Her hives are a project of Feedback Farms, a group that runs small-scale farming operations and develops systems and appropriate technology to overcome challenges of land tenancy, scale and labor in the city. Kellen is a native of West Virginia.

John

John Howe, founder of NYCbeekeeping.org, is a longtime Brooklyn apiarist now living in Devon, England. A modern bee-whisperer, John is the the basis for Fred, the main character in the award-winning children’s book, The Honeybee Man. His hands-on program “The Buzz About Bees” brings bees in observation hives to schools to educate children about the role of bees in the environment.


Rebecca

Rebecca Louie is a journalist and content strategist. When she isn’t playing with her honeybees in the Catskills, she’s playing with her composting worms in Queens. To read more of her work, please visit rebeccalouie.com. To learn about her adventures in composting, head to thecompostess.com/blog




James

James Zitting is a beekeeper in the Ozarks. Nudged by the economy, encouraged by his lovely wife Nikki, and inspired by the likes of Gene Logsden he has turned watching bees into a fulltime passion. James seeks to help others find and preserve local and genetically diverse bees.  He has setup an email group to help match natural bee producers with aspiring beekeepers.  The group can be found at: http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/beelanding/.  James teaches sustainable beekeeping and creates handmade hives for the hobbyist, homesteader, and lovers of bees and honey.  See his constantly evolving designs at www.beelanding.com.

Joshua

Joshua Rim is a senior at Williams College, where he majors in Biology.  He has a passion for the natural sciences with an interest in, among other things, bee physiology.


Michaela and Lil Deer

Michaela Medina is a pollinator-loving professional gardener, garden designer, photographer, coach and speaker.   She is also a freelance garden writer and pens two lush blogs: The Gardener’s Eden and also Garden Variety: The Barnes & Noble Gardening Blog.  She has worked as a garden designer and landscape horticulturalist in New England for more than a decade.


Dr. Reese

Dr Reese Halter, an award-winning conservation biologist, father and author with a recently published the book, The Incomparable Honeybee and the Economics of Pollination. Dr. Reese is the founder of Global Forest Science, an international charitable forest research foundation. Dr. Reese lives on the West Coast with his children and their Chesapeake Bay retriever, “Stoot,” and enjoys hiking, fishing, camping and telling stories around the campfire.


Ruby Sara

Ruby Sara is a poet, essayist and performance artist with a deep love for honeybees. Ruby holds a Masters degree in Theological Studies and maintains a semi-regular blog at www.gospelpagan.wordpress.com, where she writes about issues relating to earth-centered spirituality and contemporary paganism. Some of her most recent writing can be found in the anthologies Datura: An Anthology of Esoteric Poesis, and Devoted, both published by Scarlet Imprint.


Terry Meyer

Terry Meyer began beekeeping with two well-mannered, happy hives in 2004 upon her family’s move to a farmette in rural Virginia.  After two relatively uneventful and blissfully honey-coated years, the troubles started … lost hives, colony collapse, mean bees, wax moths.  She almost gave up, but at the last-minute this spring she dove in again in with crossed fingers, some brand new hiveware, and renewed hope.  Terry is fascinated by the industriousness, resilience, and beauty of the honeybee and loves to observe and take pictures of her bees and other pollinators at work in her garden, and to simply stand near her hives and listen to the steady hum.  She has been stung approximately 17 times … mostly during the mean bees episode.