Archive for February, 2011

Come to Me, My Sweet Willow…

Salix discolor: North American native pussy willow © 2010 Michaela at TGE

Salix discolor, North American native pussy willow – Pitcher by Aletha Soulé. Photo © Michaela TGE

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28

02 2011

Go a Little Less Green for the Environment

Consider Replacing Part or All of Your Front Lawn with a Pollinator-Friendly Garden

Photo by Michaela, The Gardener's Eden.

Lush, wide, green and rolling: In America, we love our lawns. We like to sprawl out on the grass for a picnic, gather on the neighbor’s lawn for a game of touch football, and set up our folding chairs and tiki-torches in the backyard green for summer barbeques. I like doing these things too, and I have a small lawn of my own in Vermont. But it’s important to remember that lawns, from an environmental perspective, provide little support for the ecosystem. In fact the tremendous amount of water, fossil fuel, fertilizers, herbicides, fungicides and insecticides used to maintain most suburban lawns makes our green-fixation downright irresponsible. And although green areas do reduce heat in cities, tightly cropped lawns do little to create habitat and provide food for birds, bees and the many other creatures sharing our world. Read the rest of this entry →


15

02 2011

NYC Beekeeping Event: 2/1 Talk by Professor Seeley, Author of “Honeybee Democracy”

NYC Beekeeping, which offers free beekeeping classes and takes part in extensive outreach, is hosting a talk on Saturday, February 19, 2011 at 2:00 pm with Professor Tom Seeley.  Dr. Seely, a Professor at Cornell, will speak on the topic of his new book “Honeybee Democracy: How Bees Choose a Home.”

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13

02 2011

Remembering Dr. Charles Henry Turner

Charles Henry Turner

Charles Henry Turner

Born on February 3, 1867 to former slaves, Dr. Charles Turner rose to become one of the preeminent entomologists in the United States. Dr. Turner earned his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Cincinnati and later became the first African-American to receive a Ph.D in zoology from the University of Chicago.

Dr. Turner published nearly 50 scholarly papers and is the source of a number of groundbreaking breakthroughts including the discovery that insects can hear and that ants use light and smell to travel to and from their nests.  He also discovered that honey bees have color vision and are able to recognize patterns and shapes. His seminal work pre-dated that of Nobel prize winner Karl von Frisch.

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03

02 2011